making pine pitch glue

Strong, convenient, flexible and fast setting (faster than the fastest super glue it seems). Easy to make, easy to store and easy to transport once made. It also makes a good seam sealant for bark containers (or canoes) aswell as fixing things like arrow heads to shafts. It also can waterproof things such as sinew and be diluted (with a spirit) to create a type of varnish.

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harvest resin from an injured pine, spruce or fir tree

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the ‘dirty’ resin

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hardwood charcoal from a fire – added to the resin it helps temper the glue – for flexibility, strength and durability rather than brittleness and stickiness.

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rabbit (herbivore) droppings (scat) – added to the resin it helps temper the glue – for flexibility, strength and durability rather than brittleness and stickiness.

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rabbit droppings powdered to add to the resin – in combination with the charcoal use a total of between 10 and 25% ‘filler’

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charcoal powdered to add to the resin – in combination with the droppings use a total of between 10 and 25% ‘filler’

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heated resin, loosely sieved through woven sieve to remove most debris

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rabbit scat and and charcoal added (between 10% and 25%)

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take off heat and it starts to harden very quickly!

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as it cools add to a stick and roll on a flat stone to make a resin ‘lolly’ for storage and ease of future application (you need to heat this again over heat to soften it).

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Finished lolly of pine pitch glue. Make small lollies as reheating can make the glue more brittle and small lollies are more useable for fine work.

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heat the glue up to soften it and allow it to be daubed or dripped

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drip pitch glue into area requiring it and fix item in place quickly as it sets within seconds

Very effective. Although playing around with the temper (charcoal and dung or grass/fibres) can change its toughness, flexility or brittleness. Constant re-heating of the resin can make it brittle. Boiling the initial resin too hard can also make it more brittle too as it can burn of some of the turpens and oils.

 

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